Bar Business News

H. Joseph Ehrmann, Proprietor of San Francisco’s historic Elixir saloon, celebrated the landmark anniversary of one of the city’s oldest institutions with three events highlighting separate significant milestones in the history of San Francisco’s deep saloon history.“As long as there are records of the Northwest corner of Sixteenth and Guerrero Streets, they show a saloon…
MillerCoors LLC has taken a pause in its planned campaign to launch Sparks Red caffeine-infused alcoholic drink after attorney generals from 25 states requested the company cease and desist its production of the product.According to a report in the Chicago Tribune, Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan is just one of the 25 voices representing a…
Anheuser-Busch continues to wave the stars and stripes in efforts to convince the American drinking public that, despite being on the verge of Belgian beverage giant InBev taking ownership, its beers are still as patriotic as apple pie. The latest endeavor is the recent introduction of the new Budweiser American Ale. Get the point?"We have…

You’ve heard it all before: It’s powerfully addictive. It can cause hallucinations. Vincent Van Gogh cut off his own ear after consuming it. The legends and myths prevail to this day. And, in essence, these same legends and myths are helping to drive a modern resurgence in the very liquid they haunt—absinthe, the romanticized spirit that Hemingway wrote of, and that legislation once again legalized in this country a little over a year ago.

The absinthe lore is based mostly on its original makeup. It is an anise-flavored spirit that gets its name from the base herbal ingredient Artemisia absinthium, also known as wormwood. This gives it a natural greenish color, and thus its well-worn nickname, The Green Fairy. Absinthe contains small quantities of the chemical thujone, which was blamed for most of the perceived ill-effects and hallucinogenic results following human consumption as witnessed in the late 1800s. New Orleans-born environmental chemist T.A. Breaux, who has studied absinthe for nearly 15 years, presented a better explanation in an interview given to Salon.com in December of 2007: “As absinthe became immensely popular, there was a drive to make it cheaper. In urban areas, where they didn’t have a lot of space for distillation equipment, people made absinthes from cheap industrial alcohol, using chemicals that would induce the green color. There were people who had an interest in capitalizing on this, and they failed to make a distinction between these cheaper drinks and real absinthe. It’s a little bit like using Mad Dog as a reason to ban Bordeaux.”

In 2007, the U.S. government approved the sale and consumption of absinthe in America after a near century-long ban that was based on such faulty data (it was deemed illegal in 1912, a precursor to Prohibition). Though absent no longer in the American marketplace, it will take more than just manufacturing and distribution to make this spirit prominent again. The marketing game was (and is) key, and the government’s concession was bridled with some minor product alterations that would only make such a task even more challenging. Several American importers and manufacturers have since chosen to undertake that task, and some of them recently explained to Bar Business just how they will bring absinthe back, and how bar owners throughout America can climb aboard for the ride.

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--> You’ve heard it all before: It’s powerfully addictive. It can cause hallucinations. Vincent Van Gogh cut off his own ear after consuming it. The legends and myths prevail to this day. And, in essence, these same legends and myths are helping to drive a modern resurgence in the very liquid they haunt—absinthe, the romanticized spirit…
HOW-TO: CREATE A KILLER SOUND SYSTEM Music is, by far, one of the most important components of any successful bar or club. Whether inspiring all-night dance parties in the hottest nightclub, prompting intoxicated sing-a-longs in a local tavern, or providing soothing background ambience for conversational crowds, the right (or wrong) music can make (or break)…
Results from a recent Gallup Poll reveal that the American consumer’s preference for beer over wine has increased to a double-digit margin, eradicating a brief trend that, in 2005, saw wine atop the list. According to the poll, beer is now chosen 47 percent of the time, and wine 31 percent.The annual Consumption Habits poll…

There are several cities across America with names that are simply synonymous with partying. Though all of the Big Six locations can be considered great bar and club towns, Las Vegas and Miami evoke images of decadence that give them their identities. More than anything, they are known for their clubs, and differentiating your establishment in either market can be a daunting task when opening a new venue. So, in South Beach, the folks Aero Bar took a new angle—not having any.


A 5,000-square foot ultra lounge nightclub, Aero Bar officially opened its doors in June 2008 with hopes that this intimate space could find a niche amongst the juggernaut that is Miami nightlife. Owner Tony Guerra, himself a well-known club guru affiliated with names such as Bash, Living Room, Opium, Crobar, The Forge, and Amika, designed his new club to be aerodynamic, smooth, and angle-free, both literally and figuratively. With corners throughout, there are no dark corners to hide; the club’s welcoming vibe stems from its physical design.


“It’s all about a futuristic, aerodynamic look,” says Kyle Schnedle, Aero Bar’s general manager. “It’s an oval room, with curved walls. Tony really wanted to make everything friendly and open. In the late 90s and early 2000s, South Beach started getting really arrogant, with stuffy door policies. So When Tony was designing the place, it was meant to be open and friendly, and once you get through the doors and into the club, we don’t have a designated VIP spot. We want everyone to be treated equally and with respect, so we do things a little differently here.”


Sometimes the “no-place-to-hide” concept behind Aero Bar’s design is not what certain clients want, especially when it comes to celebrities who don’t want to be bothered by fans all night. “For example, Brooke Hogan was in last weekend with her entourage and told me she just wanted her space and didn’t want to sign a million autographs all night,” says Schnedle. “So I take some of our security—which is the best on the beach—and I put them in front of her table and just keep things cool. So it’s inclusive, and yet guests can still have their space if they want.”


Schnedle, originally from Washington, D.C., has been in South Beach since 1996 and worked with Guerra at The Forge for several years, which is where their professional relationship began. When Schnedle heard about Guerra’s idea for Aero Bar, he was on board

TO READ THE COMPLETE ARTICLE AND OUR OTHER INDUSTRY FEATURES, START YOUR FREE SUBSCRIPTION TO BAR BUSINESS MAGAZINE OR BAR BUSINESS DIGITAL BY CLICKING HERE: Subscribe

--> There are several cities across America with names that are simply synonymous with partying. Though all of the Big Six locations can be considered great bar and club towns, Las Vegas and Miami evoke images of decadence that give them their identities. More than anything, they are known for their clubs, and differentiating your establishment…

Bar Business Magazine's profile on bottle service wizard Michael Ault has drawn the attention of not only club owners around the country, but also the world's most famous gossip column. Click on the headline above to see what The New York Post's Page Six™ had to say about the article.

To see the Page Six article about Bar Business, click here:

--> Bar Business Magazine's profile on bottle service wizard Michael Ault has drawn the attention of not only club owners around the country, but also the world's most famous gossip column. Click on the headline above to see what The New York Post's Page Six™ had to say about the article. To see the Page Six…

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